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What we are going to look at now is a real-time run-through of a single rescuer CPR scenario. I notice that the patient's collapsed. I'm checking for levels of response. "Hello? Hello? Hello? Can you hear me?" I'm looking inside his airway. Head tilt, chin lift. Feeling for a pulse and respirations for a maximum of 10 seconds. The patient's unresponsive, and they are not breathing normally. That's my cue to start chest compressions. Identify the lower half of the sternum. One, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, nine, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30.

Prepare the pocket mask and give two inflations. Straight back onto the chest. Six, seven, eight, nine, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30. And back for two more inflations. And already after only two cycles of CPR, you can see how I'm starting to become breathless and tired. And this means that my CPR is becoming less effective. It's much more effective when there are two rescuers and that's what we are going to have a look at next.

What we are going to look at now is a way of increasing the efficiency of our CPR by having the two-person team responding to the cardiac arrest scenario. It's important that there are a clinical lead and a decision maker, and it's also important that there are a good follower and one that's prepared to take direction from the person who's giving the instructions. In this scenario that we will see now, I will be the person that's taking a clinical lead and my colleague here will be the person who is following the instructions that I give.

Okay, Duncan.

Okay.

Okay. What we will do is we will recognize first of all that this patient's gone into a cardiac arrest. And what I'd like you to do is to take up a position at the airway and look after the patient's airway and respiration. Are you okay with that?

Okay with that.

My colleague is now in position at the head end of the patient, he's well positioned to manage the airway and the respiration, while I can carry out the chest compressions from this position. So first of all, we recognize that the patient is unresponsive. "Hello? Hello? Can you hear me?" Duncan, he's not responding. Can you check his airway please and his respirations?

The airway is clear. Head tilt, chin lift. The patient's not breathing. There's no pulse. Cardiac arrest.

Okay, that's my cue to start chest compressions. Can you prepare the face mask? 1, 2, 3, 4... 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20... 25... 28, 29, 30, and two ventilation. As soon as he's given that second ventilation... Okay Duncan, prepare to change at the end of this cycle. 25, 27, 28, 29, 30.

25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30.

And we can see that the efficiency of the CPR and the chest compressions are improved because we are actually getting the chance to have a break in between our cycles of compressions. Thank you.